Archive for October 28, 2012

TROPICAL CYCLONE SANDY TRANSITIONS INTO A HYBRID MONSTER… MILLIONS OF PEOPLE WILL BE IMPACTED BY THIS STORM… CONDITIONS IMPROVE BY MID-WEEK FOR HAMPTON ROADS

Right now (Sunday morning), Sandy is a category one hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 75 MPH. This in itself is truly irrelevant as Sandy is now transitioning into a huge hybrid storm. The areal coverage of this storm is going to be incredible as it expands outward. What does the word hybrid mean in this case? Sandy is being energized not only by warm ocean water that fuels tropical cyclones. Sandy is intensifying and becoming more massive due to difference in air masses between cooler and drier air to the north and west and the very moist air mass to the south and east. Also, atmospheric energy from the jet stream is helping to intensify this monster storm. This is the same reason that winter storms become intense. So, it would not be wise to just focus on the center of the tropical cyclone. The strongest winds may be far away from the center which is very different from a regular hurricane which as its strongest winds right around the eye-wall. The other incredible thing about this storm is the fact that all computer models have the storm making a left turn bringing it into the New Jersey coastline. Power outages will be massive along with some structural damage due to the strong winds. Coastal flooding, beach erosion, and flooding rains will be huge problems from the North Carolina coast up through New England. Inland areas are going to experience damaging high winds and flooding.  I just heard that the latest update has the pressure dropping to 951 millibars, which is an incredible barometric pressure. For us in Hampton Roads, it is expected that the winds will be slowly increasing into Monday. Rainfall will be heavy at times. Coastal flooding will be an issue also. It’s hard to say where the heaviest rain will be, but some areas may be seeing very heavy rainfall amounts. That’s it for now. Please be safe and monitor the local media and National Weather Service forecasts.

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